Anti-Muslim sentiment in America.

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I saw some heavy anti-Islam sentiment on a specific military Facebook group I had joined, being a patriot and prior military myself. Once I saw these posts though, I immediately unsubscribed from the group.  I am as proud an American as they come, however I cannot support hate nor do I want to be associated with any group that promotes such hatred and intolerance.  This being said, we cannot deny the ugly truth that the hate is out there. Hell, the hate’s in here, it’s there, it’s everywhere.

I am willing to bet that most Americans don’t hate Muslims, most of us know that Muslims as a whole are not bad people. Sure, there are extremist, but then again, there are American extremists too. Every group and every culture has extremists in their ranks.

Unfortunately for American Muslims, thanks to the years and years of propaganda we have been fed for so long, many Americans have a little switch that goes off in their heads when we see someone in a traditional Muslim outfit. New Yorkers are naturally suspicious of anyone that covers their face, now add to that the years of brainwashing and you create an environment that can go well beyond just suspicion and into downright hostility. Some people have allowed themselves to become consumed by what they are being told, and they have become full of hate towards Muslims. For instance, the members of these Facebook groups. Instead of directing the hatred towards Muslims, I’d ask that you do away with those feelings. But if you cannot, then direct the feelings towards the individual extremists, not the whole culture or religion.

Let’s take a few moments and discuss this song called “The American Dream”. I recently heard this song by NYC based underground rapper, “King Sage“. The song begins with a snippet of Bill O’reilly discussing racial profiling at the airports or anywhere else in the United States.

Personally I believe profiling is necessary to a degree in this world, whether we all admit it or not, we all profile people every single day. We’ve covered profiling here already, if you’d like to read that post take a look here. We spoke about profiling overall, King Sage however is talking about a more specific type of profiling. He’s talking about the profiling of Arabs and Muslims at the airport and other locations, or whenever anything terror related happens.

The song basically says that these folks are being used as scapegoats by the media, politicians, etc. He says that rather than see the good people they are, most would rather see a suicide bomber. The hook on the song says:

“You’d rather see me on your tv screaming suicide”

Ever since 9/11, the media has fed us anti-Islamic propaganda, and they have succeeded in scaring the crap out of normal, everyday Americans. I know Muslims that have been here their whole lives, and they themselves dislike extremists. They dislike what they do in the name of God, and they dislike what they have done to their people’s image. They dislike that not only Americans, but even their own fellow Muslims were killed during the attacks on 9/11.

King Sage is a fine example of a good citizen that could easily be profiled and detained simply based on the way he looks. Yet this brother can probably relate and associate with our streets more than many Americans that fit the “American” image template.

What is the bottom line here? Though I believe profiling has it’s place, and it can save lives, where do we draw the line? Where does one decide who is eligible to be profiled? Who gets to decide? There is a fine line we walk in this society between safety and political correctness. Remember Army Major Hasan, the Muslim U.S soldier that went on a shooting rampage and killed 11 people? This could have been prevented if they weren’t being so politically correct.

The question remains, how do we find that balance?



Note the date on a post as it may be an old point of view. If you learn that your views are wrong, yet they remain the same, then you are a fool.

The opinions and views expressed are solely those of the author.